You’re a single parent

Qantas Assure Single Parent Cover

You’re a single parent

Qantas Assure Single Parent Cover

The only Single Parent Health Insurance with Qantas Points

When you join or switch to Qantas Assure Health Insurance, you can earn Qantas Points – points you can put towards your next holiday, upgrades and more.

Earn up to 50,000 Qantas Points when you join or switch 1
Earn 1 Qantas Point per $1 spent on your premium 2
Earn Qantas Points for using the Qantas Assure App 3

Your single parent cover options

Hospital Covers
  • Hospital Covers
  • Extras Covers
  • Family Bundles

Basic

Basic Plus

Mid

Advanced

Top

Top reasons to do the switcheroo

1

Waiting periods recognised

Waiting periods already served for comparable services will be recognised

2

No surprises

Get 60% or 75% back on Extras up to your annual limit when you claim

3

Freedom of choice

Choose the Extras provider you want, not the one your fund prefers

4

No paperwork

All the paperwork will be taken care of for you, so you don't have to worry

switch and earn

What is health insurance?

Private health insurance has two parts – Hospital and Extras cover. They can help you avoid lengthy wait times for public hospitals, help offset the costs of health care services not covered by Medicare, and allow you to choose your doctor.

What is Hospital cover?

Hospital cover helps pay the often high costs of in-hospital services such as surgery, anaesthesia, private rooms and theatre fees, and will vary according to the level of cover you choose, your service provider, and the procedure involved.

What is Extras cover?

Extras cover helps pay for things that are ‘extra’ to in-hospital services – and not covered by Medicare. Purchased separately or together with Hospital cover, an Extras policy covers health care services like dental, physio and optical.

Helping you understand…

  • Australian Government Rebate
    • The Australian Government Rebate (AGR) helps you save on your health insurance by offering you a rebate on your premium.

      The government applies the AGR to support your involvement in private health insurance – and also acknowledge that some Australian residents have more capacity to pay for health insurance than others.

      Your AGR is based on 2 things:

      1. The age of the oldest person on your policy
      2. Your taxable income, or combined incomes if you’re a family (including de facto relationships)

      To calculate your individual AGR, use the Australian Taxation Office’s Private Health Insurance Rebate Calculator or this table.

      Please note: If you have two or more children, the family income threshold is increased by $1,500 for every dependant child after the first child.

    • Australian Government Rebate Table

  • Lifetime Health Cover
    • The Lifetime Health Cover (LHC) is a Government initiative designed to incentivise Australian residents to take out – and maintain – private hospital cover earlier in life.

      How do I avoid this loading?

      To avoid the LHC, the important thing to remember is to take out Hospital cover before 1 July, following your 31st birthday. If you haven't taken it out by then, the LHC cuts in and adds an extra 2% loading to the cost of your premium for every year you don't have private health insurance after this date. The maximum loading is 70%. Any LHC loading will be removed after you have completed 10 years of continuous cover.

      If you are a couple or family policy, your loading is calculated as an average between the individual loading of the two adults. For example, if one person has 20% loading and the other person has 0% loading, the loading applied to the couple’s policy is 10%.

      You can see from this chart an example of how much extra you would have to pay if you missed the LHC deadline, for every year that you put it off:

    • Lifetime Health Cover Table

      So if you wait until you’re 40, you’ll pay 20% more than someone on the same cover who joined when they were 31.

      For more information visit www.privatehealth.gov.au

  • The Financial Gap
    • The Gap you hear talked about simply refers to the amount of money you will have to pay out of your own pocket for medical treatment in hospital, also known as “out-of-pocket” expenses.

      In essence, the Gap reflects the difference between what your treatment costs and the Medicare rebate you may receive plus your Health Fund Benefit.

      In other words, if there’s a shortfall – or gap – between the doctor’s fee and what you get back, then you have to make up the balance of the bill.

    • Importantly, the Gap will vary depending on your doctor – and your health fund.

      Your doctor will tell you what you can expect to pay over and above your health insurance.

      Sometimes, due to a prior arrangement between your doctor and your health fund, you will not have to pay any Gap at all.

  • Waiting Periods
    • Waiting Periods are the time you have to wait before you can claim on your health insurance cover.

      The Federal Government sets these for Hospital cover and health funds set them for Extras cover. Typically, Waiting Periods are 2, 6 or 12 months.

      Waiting Periods exist to ensure individuals aren’t able to make a large claim shortly after joining and then cancel their policy, which would detrimentally affect other members by causing increased prices to cover these costs.

      However, if you switch insurer you can claim straight away, provided you take out an equivalent or lesser level of cover and have already served your waiting periods.

    • But if you switch to a higher cover you will need to wait before you can claim on newly covered services.

      As a guide, if you’re new to hospital cover or upgrading your cover, you can expect these Waiting Periods:

      • 12 months for pre-existing conditions
      • 12 months for Obstetrics
      • 2 months for Psychiatric care, Rehabilitation or Palliative care (whether or not these are pre-existing conditions)
      • 2 months in all other circumstances
  • All Australian residents pay a contribution towards the cost of running Medicare, our national health care system. It’s called the Medicare Levy and comes off your annual tax return.

    The Medicare Levy Surcharge (MLS) is a tax on top of the Medicare Levy that’s applied to individuals and couples on higher incomes.

    In this way it encourages those who can afford it to take out Hospital cover, so the burden on the public system is lessened.

    You won’t pay the MLS…

    • If you have an appropriate amount of cover (defined as Hospital cover with an excess of $500 or less, or $1000 or less for couples and families).

    • If your annual taxable income is less than $90,000, or $180,000 for a couple.

    You will pay the MLS if your income is above the thresholds in this table:

  • Medicare Surcharge Table

    * Please note: If you have two or more children, the family income threshold is increased by $1,500 for every dependant child after the first child.

  • The Australian Government Rebate (AGR) helps you save on your health insurance by offering you a rebate on your premium.

    The government applies the AGR to support your involvement in private health insurance – and also acknowledge that some Australian residents have more capacity to pay for health insurance than others.

    Your AGR is based on 2 things:

    1. The age of the oldest person on your policy
    2. Your taxable income, or combined incomes if you’re a family (including de facto relationships)

    To calculate your individual AGR, use the Australian Taxation Office’s Private Health Insurance Rebate Calculator or this table.

    Please note: If you have two or more children, the family income threshold is increased by $1,500 for every dependant child after the first child.

  • Australian Government Rebate Table

  • The Lifetime Health Cover (LHC) is a Government initiative designed to incentivise Australian residents to take out – and maintain – private hospital cover earlier in life.

    How do I avoid this loading?

    To avoid the LHC, the important thing to remember is to take out Hospital cover before 1 July, following your 31st birthday. If you haven't taken it out by then, the LHC cuts in and adds an extra 2% loading to the cost of your premium for every year you don't have private health insurance after this date. The maximum loading is 70%. Any LHC loading will be removed after you have completed 10 years of continuous cover.

    If you are a couple or family policy, your loading is calculated as an average between the individual loading of the two adults. For example, if one person has 20% loading and the other person has 0% loading, the loading applied to the couple’s policy is 10%.

    You can see from this chart an example of how much extra you would have to pay if you missed the LHC deadline, for every year that you put it off:

  • Lifetime Health Cover Table

    So if you wait until you’re 40, you’ll pay 20% more than someone on the same cover who joined when they were 31.

    For more information visit www.privatehealth.gov.au

  • The Gap you hear talked about simply refers to the amount of money you will have to pay out of your own pocket for medical treatment in hospital, also known as “out-of-pocket” expenses.

    In essence, the Gap reflects the difference between what your treatment costs and the Medicare rebate you may receive plus your Health Fund Benefit.

    In other words, if there’s a shortfall – or gap – between the doctor’s fee and what you get back, then you have to make up the balance of the bill.

  • Importantly, the Gap will vary depending on your doctor – and your health fund.

    Your doctor will tell you what you can expect to pay over and above your health insurance.

    Sometimes, due to a prior arrangement between your doctor and your health fund, you will not have to pay any Gap at all.

  • Waiting Periods are the time you have to wait before you can claim on your health insurance cover.

    The Federal Government sets these for Hospital cover and health funds set them for Extras cover. Typically, Waiting Periods are 2, 6 or 12 months.

    Waiting Periods exist to ensure individuals aren’t able to make a large claim shortly after joining and then cancel their policy, which would detrimentally affect other members by causing increased prices to cover these costs.

    However, if you switch insurer you can claim straight away, provided you take out an equivalent or lesser level of cover and have already served your waiting periods.

  • But if you switch to a higher cover you will need to wait before you can claim on newly covered services.

    As a guide, if you’re new to hospital cover or upgrading your cover, you can expect these Waiting Periods:

    • 12 months for pre-existing conditions
    • 12 months for Obstetrics
    • 2 months for Psychiatric care, Rehabilitation or Palliative care (whether or not these are pre-existing conditions)
    • 2 months in all other circumstances

Why Qantas Assure?

Today, Qantas Frequent Flyer members can feel confident that they’ll be looked after from the moment they take out an insurance policy, right through to when they claim.

Qantas Assure Health Insurance is piloted by Qantas and backed by nib, insurance underwriters since 1952. In 2016, nib paid out a record $1.36 billion in claims, the equivalent of $26 million per week, so you can see why they are our chosen partner.

Why Qantas Assure?

Today, Qantas Frequent Flyer members can feel confident that they’ll be looked after from the moment they take out an insurance policy, right through to when they claim.

Qantas Assure Health Insurance is piloted by Qantas and backed by nib, insurance underwriters since 1952. In 2016, nib paid out a record $1.36 billion in claims, the equivalent of $26 million per week, so you can see why they are our chosen partner.

Switch and earn Qantas Points

1, 2, 3 Disclaimers

Qantas Assure Health Insurance is issued by nib health funds limited ABN 83 000 124 381 (nib) a registered private health insurer, and is arranged by Qantas Airways Limited ABN 16 009 661 901 (Qantas), for which Qantas receives commission.

It is important to be aware that health insurance will only cover the portion of costs that relate to an admission to hospital. Specialist fees outside of hospital or other outpatient fees in relation to chemotherapy or radiotherapy aren’t covered.

High cost drugs are sometimes requested for the Treatment of some cancers. Typically high-cost drugs are for newer Treatments that are not recognised by the Pharmaceutical Benefit Scheme (PBS) because the PBS considers them to be still under clinical trial and therefore experimental Treatments. Health insurance will not Cover high cost drugs for the same reasons (or may only Cover a small portion of the cost). It is the responsibility of the treating doctor, and Hospital, to inform Patients about the potential for large out-of-pockets as a result of high cost drugs.